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Students honor nation's veterans

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education New Richmond, 54017
New Richmond News
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New Richmond Wisconsin 127 South Knowles Avenue 54017

At New Richmond Middle School, students and staff think it's important to take time to recognize veterans on Veterans Day.

At the annual Veterans Day celebration, teacher Gabe Henk said the day dedicated to veterans is just one way to thank them for the gift they gave all Americans.

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The program at the middle school included performances by the eighth grade choir, middle school orchestra and band.

Students Emma Burns, Taya Chevrette and Melanie Vossen read their Patriots Pen Essays and explained why they were proud to be Americans.

The guest speaker for the program was 1st Sgt. Dan Blanchard, a Marine, who said veterans wrote a check to America for an amount up to and including their lives.

The program was concluded with an explanation of how to properly fold the flag.

The flag demonstration was also performed at St. Mary's School's Veterans Day program on Friday, Nov. 11.

When folded, a flag should be folded 13 times.

The first fold of the flag is a symbol of life.

The second fold is a symbol of our belief in eternal life.

The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veterans departing our ranks who gave a portion of their lives for the defense of our country to attain peace throughout the world.

The fourth fold represents our weaker nature, for as American citizens trusting in God, it is to Him we turn in times of peace as well as in time of war for His divine guidance.

The fifth fold is a tribute to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decalur. "Our Country", in dealing with other countries, may she always be right; but it is still our country right or wrong.

The sixth fold is for where our hearts lie. It is with our heart that we pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

The seventh fold is a tribute to our Armed Forces, for it is through the Armed Forces that we protect our country and our flag against all her enemies, whether they be found within or without the boundaries of our republic.

The eighth fold is a tribute to the one who entered into the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day.

The ninth fold is a tribute to womanhood, and mothers, for it has been through their faith, their love, loyalty and devotion that the character of the men and women who have made this country great has been molded.

The 10th fold is a tribute to the father, for he, too, has given his sons and daughters for defense of our country since they were first born.

The 11th fold represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon and glorifies in the Hebrews' eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.

The 12th fold represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in the Christians' eyes, God the Father, the Son, and Holy Spirit.

The 13th fold, or when the flag is completely folded, the stars are uppermost reminding us of our nation's motto, "In God We Trust."

After the flag is completely folded and tucked in, it takes on the appearance of a cocked hat, reminding us of the soldiers who served under General George Washington, and the Sailors and Marines who served under Captain John Paul Jones, who were followed by their comrades and shipmates in the Armed Forces of the United States, preserving for us the rights, privileges and freedoms we enjoy today.

In addition to the flag presentation, students also recited poems, sang songs and presented veterans with special table placemats as a gift for their service to the country.

A brief breakfast was conducted following the event.

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Jackie Grumish
Jackie Grumish has been a reporter with the New Richmond News since 2008. She holds degrees in journalism and fine art from Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, Ill. Before coming to New Richmond, Jackie worked as the city government reporter at a daily newspaper in Aberdeen, S.D. 
(715) 243-7767 x243
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