Spring Valley man gets 20 years in prison

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A Spring Valley man was sentenced to 30 years last week in a sexual assault case that spanned two counties.

Pierce County Circuit Court Judge Joe Boles sentenced 35-year-old Jason C. Koskie to 20 years in prison and 10 years on extended supervision. Koskie pleaded guilty in November 2016 to first-degree child sex assault and repeated sexual assault of the same child.

He was also charged with first-degree child sex assault in St. Croix County — a charge that was dismissed there, but counted toward Koskie's sentence.

Boles' sentence followed Pierce County District Attorney Sean Froelich's recommendation. Froelich said the "sheer number" of offenses Koskie admitted to dictated the sentence.

"The egregiousness of the acts called for a sentence such as this," he said Monday.

The sentence represented the longest such prison term in recent memory that's been handed down in Pierce County for a sex assault, Froelich said.

"It's important to send the message that as a society, we are going to hold people accountable for their actions," he said.

Defense attorney Julie Weber argued for a prison term of about seven years, with up to six years on extended supervision.

Koskie was charged in March 2016 after the victim told her mother about the abuse, which Koskie admitted to in an interview with investigators.

He also faced a felony bail jumping charge for contacting the victim in violation of bond conditions. That charge was thrown out as part of a plea agreement.

The case filed in St. Croix County involved a child who was younger than 10 when the abuse occurred.

"It shows a clear pattern that there was a need to protect the public," Froelich said.

One victim's mother read a statement she and the girl prepared.

Koskie, who must register as a sex offender and complete sex offender treatment in prison, also spoke at the hearing. Froelich said Koskie admitted to some of the assaults during his statement to the court.

Conditions of Koskie's extended supervision also include no contact with minors who are not family and no contact with his children without clearance from a parole agent and supervision during the visit.