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Wisconsin roundup: Democratic lawmaker alleges all-night lame-duck session was illegal; more state news stories

A Democratic member of the Wisconsin Assembly plans to file a complaint alleging the all-night lame-duck legislative session in December violated the open meetings law.

Representative Jimmy Anderson is paralyzed and can't sit in his wheelchair for more than a day. He had to leave hours before the Assembly voted. A spokesperson says the open meetings law means duly elected members of government bodies can't be excluded. Dane County District Attorney Ismael Ozanne could file a suit seeking to void the votes if he feels they were illegal.

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Bipartisan task force recommends more spending on public education

A bipartisan legislative task force is recommending the state cover two-thirds of all public education costs.

Gov. Tony Evers campaigned on the promise of a $1.4 billion increase in state funding for schools. The Blue Ribbon Commission on School Funding didn't offer a cost estimate for its recommendations. The state of Wisconsin is covering 65.4 percent of public school spending for the 2018-19 school year and the task force recommends that amount be increased to two-thirds.

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Wisconsin food shelves prep for high demand as shutdown continues

Food banks across Wisconsin are reportedly bracing for an increase in the number of people seeking help as the partial federal government shutdown stretches through its third week.

Feeding America Eastern Wisconsin President Patti Habeck tells The Appleton Post-Crescent that the organization is preparing extra food for pantries as thousands of federal employees in Wisconsin cope without pay. Wisconsin families that rely on benefits under the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also known as food stamps, are also growing concerned as the partial government shutdown continues. President Donald Trump's administration announced Tuesday that the program will be funded through February should the shutdown centered on Trump's request for $5.7 billion in border wall funding continue.

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Superior man given 35 years behind bars for sexual assault of a child

A Douglas County Circuit Court judge has sentenced a Superior man to 35 years in prison for the sexual assault of a child.

Twenty-seven-year-old Godfrey Joseph LaBonte Was found guilty last week. The 8-year-old victim had told a family member about the assault in December 2017, identifying LaBonte as the attacker. At the sentencing hearing, the prosecutor told the judge about LaBonte's 27 previous criminal convictions.

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Closing of Rhinelander business will mean 289 lost jobs

When the pet supplier Doctors Foster and Smith shuts down its Rhinelander operations next month, 289 people will be out of a job.

Parent company Petco made the announcement Wednesday. It says the move will let it streamline operations and do a better job of focusing on its core business and its customers. Petco bought the northern Wisconsin business in 2015. The co-owned Live Aquaria business will stay open, saving nearly 60 jobs.

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Government shutdown keeps ID theft victim from reporting it to feds

A Fitchburg identity theft victim says the government shutdown is stopping him from reporting the illegal use of his Social Security number.

Zach Maerz was told a person used his information to open an account last weekend in Illinois. When he went online to report the problem and have his Social Security number flagged, he found out that service isn't available now. The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protect recommends filing a fraud alert with the major credit bureaus and reporting the problem to your financial institutions.

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Twelve-year-old’s suicide shocks Eau Claire community

Eau Claire community members are struggling to understand after the suicide of a 12-year-old boy.

Gage Wright committed suicide Sunday afternoon. The Northstar Middle School seventh grader was a baseball standout and straight-A student who had received the Presidential Award for Academics. The school's principal sent a letter to parents that included signs they should watch for in their children.

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Bio-Tech Firm To Add 100 Jobs At Madison Facility

A New Jersey-based bio-tech company is promising to add 100 jobs over the next three years at its location in Madison.

Catalent Biologics will spend almost $100 million on the expansion project. Catalent develops and makes pharmaceutical products. The 60,000-square-foot addition to the Madison plant is the second expansion in about two years. Work should be complete by 2021 and hiring has already started.