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Abortion is not health care

TO THE EDITOR

Definition of health care: efforts made to maintain or restore physical, mental, or emotional well-being especially by trained and licensed professionals.

We can all agree that health care is something that is done to mend an illness or injury of sorts. With that in mind, how did the political elite in this country come to the conclusion that an abortion is a form of health care?

In almost all cases of abortion, the mother and the baby are perfectly healthy up to the time the abortion is conducted. Killing a perfectly healthy baby is in fact, the complete opposite of health care. It is about the unhealthiest form of care an unborn child can receive next to being murdered and in fact abortion and murder achieve the same result!

Planned Parenthood is not about helping women. Their primary motivation is about making money and they do so by killing the most vulnerable among us; babies in their mother's wombs. They make millions of dollars a year and they also receive millions of dollars of our taxpayer money each year to subsidize their propaganda and of course, to contribute money (back) to Democrats. How bad does that smell?

I hold no ill feeling for women who have had abortions. I am sorry for their pain and I have said a prayer for them and their little one for they have been taken advantage of by a very warped part of our society. I do have anger towards the people who promote and endorse abortion as a right or a choice. I see them as the stench of the earth. We all know who these people are. How much longer will we continue to ignore the truth about abortion?

Thomas Wulf

New Richmond

Soul searching needed

TO THE EDITOR

According to new analysis of data obtained by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, Wisconsin has the FIFTH most sex offenders per capita as compared to the other 45 states. Put another way, Wisconsin is among the leaders of states with the most sex offenders in the nation.

As a mother with kids, I feel this statistic in the pit of my stomach. Few would disagree with the seriousness and irreparable level of trauma and harm that comes with sexual assault. Spend any amount of time on social media and the sentiment that sexual predators should hang from trees is alive and well in Wisconsin. So, what gives?

My two cents, for whatever it's worth: it's a combination of two things. One, our state's very liberal and reckless culture on alcohol, and two, the shockingly softball approach we take to policing, prosecuting and sentencing sexual predators. Every time we reduce a felony rape to a misdemeanor for probation, diversion or a fine, instead of sending a message that acting on inappropriate sexual power and control urges will quite literally ruin your life, we say "meh, it's not so bad." Every time we tell a rape survivor she has to co-parent with her rapist, we send a powerful message implicitly condoning sexual assault as not really such a big deal. We substitute inconvenience for sexual predators rather than game changing consequences that ensure that they never hurt anyone else again.

Diamonds aren't created through easy conditions. No one changes for the better or faces their demons, that of which they're ashamed because it's fun, easy or convenient. By not being stronger on sexual assault from our laws down to their enforcement we create a scenario by which the path of least resistance for someone inclined to sexually assault is to do nothing until eventually they act on it.

Wisconsin's culture on alcohol is the kerosene to the flame.

Option 1: continue on with a sense of learned helplessness, throw up our hands and falsely believe that's just the way life has to be.

Option 2: demand better from our elected officials, look to other states that have grown past these problems and learn, be willing to try something else. The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again expecting a different result. We're better than this.

Sarah Yacoub

Hudson

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